Admiral Re Coontz AP-122 - History

Admiral Re Coontz AP-122 - History


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Admiral R. E. Coontz

(AP-122: dp. 23,500 (f.), 1. 609', b. 76', dr. 27' (max.), s. 22 k. cpl. 367, trp. 4,680, a. 4 5", 8 40mm., 28 20mm., cl. Admiral W.S. Benson; T. P2-SE2-R1)

Admiral R. Coontz (AP-122) was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 680) on 15 January 1943 at Alameda Calif., by the Bethlehem Steel Corp., launched on 22 April l9i4, sponsored by Mrs. Edwin Kokko, daughter of Admiral Coontz, and commissioned on 21 November 1944, Capt. Montford R. Tawes, USNR, in command.

Following shakedown training out of San Pedro, Calif., the transport embarked troops at San Francisco and sailed for the western Pacific on 3 January 1945. After pausing: briefly at Pearl Harbor she reached Ulithi, in the Western Carolines, on 23 January and served there as station shin until 19 March when she headed homeward. Admiral R. Coontz made one additional voyage from San Francisco to Ulithi. On her return she touched at San Francisco and San Diego, transited the Panama Canal, and pushed on across the Atlantic to France. She embarked troops for transfer to the Pacific theater, cleared Marseilles on 21 July, and reached Pearl Harbor on 12 August. Underway soon again, she paused at Eniwetok, Saipan, and Guam en route to Ulithi which she reached on 28 August, almost a fortnight after Japan capitulated.

Leaving the Western Carolines on 12 September, Adm.iral R. Coontz sailed for Okinawa, whence she sailed on 27 September for the west coast of the United States. Making port at Bremerton, Wash., the transport embarked occupation troops before getting underway for Japan on 24 October. After disembarking troops at Nagasaki on 6 November and at Nagoya two days later, Admiral R. Coontz then made two round-trip; voyages between Yokohama and Seattle. She then proceeded to Okinawa to embark passengers for the return voyage to the United States. Sailing for Hawaii, the transport embarked more troops at Pearl Harbor and reached New York City on 11 March 1945.

She entered the Todd Shipyard, Brooklyn, N.Y., on 17 March 1946 and was decommissioned there on the 25th. Stricken from the Navy list in April 1946 and turned over to the War Department, the ship underwent a period of repairs and alterations and was renamed General Alexander M. Patch, honoring General Alexander McCarrell Patch, commander of the 7th Army in the invasion of Southern France in 1944.

In the Army Transport Service, General Alexander M. Patch carried troops and cargo between Europe and the United States from 1946 to 1950. Reacquired bv the Navy on 3 March 1950, the ship operated for the next two decades as USNS Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122) with the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS), later renamed the Military Sealift Command (MSC). From 1950 to 1965 the ship conducted 123 round-trip voyages between Bremerhaven and New York, with an additional 16 voyages to the Mediterranean. Among her passengers was Mrs. Alexander M. Patch, the widow of the general for whom the ship had been named.

Among her operations was the embarkation of over 1,500 refugees during the Suez Crisis in November 1956. The transport took them from Suda Bay, Crete—where they had been brought from Alexandria Egypt, and Haifa, Israel, by American warships—to Napies. Late in 1961, during the international tensions spawned by the Soviets' closure of access to West Berlin General Alexander M. Patch participated in the massive lift of American troops to Europe.

In August 1965, growing American involvement in the Vietnam War prompted the transfer of MSTS ships from the Atlantic to the Pacific. General Alexander M. Patch commenced her first Vietnam voyage at New York on 15 August. Steaming via Charleston, S.C., and Long Beach, Calif., the transport reached Qui Nhon, South Vietnam, on 16 September. Returning—via Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, and Okinawa—to San 3Francisco on 2 October, the ship conducted one more voyage to Vietnam in 1965, reaching Vung Tau on 9 November. Clearing Vung Tau later that day she returned to New York by way of Penang Malaysia, Rota, Spain, and Bremerhaven.

For the first six months of 1966 General Alexander M. Patch operated between New York an] Bremerhaven. The Vietnam War once again compelled MSTS to switch some of its transports to the Pacific. Patch and her sistership General William 0. Darby (T-AP-127), embarked of the Army's 196th Light Infantry Brigade at Boston and departed on 15 July. Transiting the Panama Canal, the two transports reached Vung Tau, South Vietnam, on 13 August, ending the longest (12,358 nautical miles) point-to-point troop lift in the 17 years that MSTS had been in ODeration. Before the year was out, General Alexander M. Patch conducted two troop lifts of ROK (Republic of Korea) troops from Pusan to South Vietnam.

Placed in reserve in New York's upper bay along with three of her sisterships by the summer of 1967, General Alexander M. Patch was transferred to the custody of the Maritime Administration on 26 May 1970 and placed in reserve in the James River. Still carried on the Naval Vessel Register, she remains in the James River berthing area of the National Defense Reserve Fleet into mid-1985.


Admiral Re Coontz AP-122 - History

A former name retained. .Alexander McCarrell Patch, Jr., born 23 November 1889 at Fort Huachuca, Ariz., graduated from the U.S. Military Academy 12 June 1913 and was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Infantry. Prior to World War I, he served in Texas and Arizona and from June 1917 until May 1919 he joined the 18th Infantry in France participating in the Aisne-Marne, St. Mihel, and Meuse-Argonne Offensives. During the next 20 years he was stationed at various posts in the United States. Assigned to the 47th Infantry at Fort Bragg, N.C., in August 1940, he was promoted to Brigadier General 4 August 1941. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor he assumed command of Allied forces in New Caledonia 12 March 1942, and on 8 December he relieved General Vandegrift, USMC, on Guadalcanal and took command of composite American forces operating against the Japanese in the Solomon Islands. He returned to the United States in April 1943 and assumed command of the IV Corps. In March 1944 he was designated Commanding General of the 7th Army in Sicily. Promoted to Lieutenant General 7 August 1944 he served with the 7th Army in France. He then took command of the 4th Army in July 1945 and died 21 November while on duty at Fort Sam Houston, Tex.

Admiral R.E. Coontz (AP-122) (q.v.) was reacquired by the Navy from the Army Transport Service as General Alexander H. Patch 1 March 1950 and assigned to MSTS. Manned by a civilian crew, she operated out of New York to Bremerhaven, Germany, and Southampton, England, during the next 5 years, rotating troops, transporting military dependents, and carrying European refugees to the United States. During October and November 1956 she steamed to the Mediterranean where she supported peace-keeping operations of the mighty 6th Fleet.

Returning to New York 15 November, she resumed transatlantic service to Bremerhaven. From I956 to 11965, she completed more than 120 voyages to Bremerhaven and back. She also deployed to the Mediterranean six more times, and, during political crises in Jordan and Lebanon, she supported counteraction by the 6th Fleet.


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Product Description

USS Admiral RE Coontz AP 122

2 Dec 1944 - 26 Nov 1945

World War II Cruise Book (RARE FIND)

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Admiral R E Coontz AP 122 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Cruise Chart
  • Ships Log (Port and Arrival and Departure Dates)
  • Ports of Call - Pearl Harbor, Ulithi, Canal, Gibraltar, Marseille, Saipan, Guam, Okinawa, Nagoya, Yokohama and Tokyo
  • Commissioning and Launching the Ship
  • Divisional Group Photos
  • Officer and Crew Roster by Division

Over 61 photos and the ships story told on 30 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Transport during World War II.

Additional Bonus:

  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
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    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

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    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

    If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

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    USNS General Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122)

    USS Admiral R. E. Coontz AP - 122 later the USNS General Alexander M Patch T - AP - 122 was an Admiral W. S. Benson - class transport built for the U.S
    Europe. Patch Barracks also has a middle school named after General Patch The United States Navy transport USNS General Alexander M Patch T - AP - 122 was
    T - AP - 154 USNS General M B. Stewart T - AP - 140 USNS General M L. Hersey T - AP - 148 USNS General M M Patrick T - AP - 150 USNS General R. E. Callan T - AP - 139
    AG - 5 USNS General Alexander M Patch T - AP - 122 USS General Arnold 1776 USS General Bragg 1851 USS General Burnside 1862 USS General C. C. Ballou
    USNS General Alexander M Patch T - AP - 122 USS Admiral E. W. Eberle AP - 123 USNS General Simon B. Buckner T - AP - 123 USS Admiral C. F. Hughes AP - 124
    embarked from Bremerhaven, Germany on 26 May 1953 aboard the USNS General Alexander M Patch T - AP - 122 and traveled in Cabin Class. They arrived in New York

    variants of the design were built, the P2 - SE2 - R1 Admirals P2 - S2 - R2 Generals and P2 - SE2 - R3 Presidents Ten P2 - SE2 - R1 ships were ordered by the Maritime
    According to General Creighton W. Abrams, the American commander in Vietnam, the main impetus for the offensive came from Colonel Alexander M Haig, an aide
    Base for about an hour. B - 50D - 105 - BO, 48 - 122 converted to WB - 50D. Crashed with 56th WRS. 22 September USN VCP - 61 lost an aircraft 180 miles SE of Naha
    US 195 million Canada US 160 million Australia, US 144 million Norway, US 122 million and Denmark, US 110 million. Israel and Singapore have joined as

    P2 transport Military Fandom.

    Ahead of them respectively are USNS General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122 and USNS General Maurice Rose T AP 126. U.S. Naval. World Ocean Database: code tables NODC NOAA. 3. DOD EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM. 118. Task Unit 132.1.1 Activities. 122. Helicopter 20 Oct 52. Transport USNS General E.T. Coll ns T AP 147. 192.

    Your closest link to Ships we drive in WOW Page 3 General Game.

    His father, Captain Alexander M. Patch, was a former cavalryman in the USNS General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122 was also named for General Patch. On the Dynamics of Motion Sickness in a Seaway JStor. Free: Postcard U.S.N.S. General Alexander M. Patch T AP122 Hanover Ent. ​Chrome FREE SHIP Other Collectibles. GENEARL ALEXANDER M. PATCH - yo hi red devils. Was on, the USNS Gen. Alexander M. Patch, T AP 122 crossed the Atlantic. The ship was part of the Military Sea Transportation Service MSTS known today​. USS PATCH FineScale Modeler Essential magazine for scale. R. E. Coontz AP 122 then in service for the Army USAT before being returned to Naval duty as the USNS General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122 in 1950.

    Operations in the april june 1965 Marine Corps University.

    USS Gen. A. E. Anderson, T AP 111. USS Gen. Wm. A. Mann, T AP 112 USNS M. San Luis Obispo, T AO 127 USNS Gen Alexander M. Patch, T AP 122. Admiral W. S. Benson AP 120 Class: Photographs Shipscribe. Under General Alexander M. Patch, and the French First Army, under. General meeting several years ago, We dont expect you historians to tell us what we.

    1940s U. S. Naval Ship General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122 Etsy.

    USS Admiral C.F. Hughes AP 124 WWII. Alexander Hamilton, 1830 na. Oct​. 29, 2019. Aaron V. Brown, 1861 na. Oct. 29, 2019. AB Class, 1913 1938. MSTS ELM USAREUR Units & Kasernes, 1945 1989. USNS General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122 ex. USAT General Alexander M. Patch 1946 1950 USS Admiral R. E. Coontz AP 122 1944 1946. USN Ships - USNS General Simon B. Buckner T AP 123 Ibiblio. Seller says Congressman, Governor, Confederate General who nominated Jeff Postcard with picture of U.S.N.S. ALEXANDER M. PATCH T AP122.

    This Royal Order of Atlantic Voyageurs Navy Department Library.

    USS Admiral R. E. Coontz AP 122, USAT General Alexander M. Patch, USNS General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122. USS Admiral E. W. Eberle AP 123. Admiral W. S Sims Hist. USNS General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122 Entering New York Harbor on 14 June 1950. Photographed soon after her 1 March 1950 transfer from the Army,.

    GENERAL ALEXANDER M PATCH T AP 122 NavalCoverMuseum.

    James E. Robinson T AKV 3 USNS Pvt Joseph F. Merrell T AKV 4 USNS Sgt USNS General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122 USNS General C. C. Ballou. Riviera To The Rhine US Army Center of Military History. USNS General William O. Darby T AP 127 spent most of her career on most likely either General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122 or General. AP 120 Admiral W. S. Benson Class Glob. During USNS Gen. Alexander M. Patch T AP ring to them as tubs or rust buckets, so WWII, he commanded troops in Alaska. 122. I guess I. Alexander Patch Nes. Dad spent a miserable week in stormy weather sailing across the Atlantic on the USNS General Alexander M. Patch T AP 122. Two years. USNS GEN ALEXANDER M PATCH TRANSPORT SHIP PLAYING. Photo: Susan Walsh, Associated Press. Foreword. The explosion that tore through the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig last April 20, as the rigs crew completed.


    Admiral Re Coontz AP-122 - History

    2 Dec 1944 - 26 Nov 1945

    A great part of naval history.

    You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Admiral R E Coontz AP 122 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    • Cruise Chart
    • Ships Log (Port and Arrival and Departure Dates)
    • Ports of Call - Pearl Harbor, Ulithi, Canal, Gibraltar, Marseille, Saipan, Guam, Okinawa, Nagoya , Yokohama and Tokyo
    • Commissioning and Launching the Ship
    • Divisional Group Photos
    • Officer and Crew Roster by Division

    Over 61 photos and the ships story told on 30 pages.

    Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Transport during World War II.


    Contents

    In World War II [ edit ]

    Following shakedown training out of San Pedro, CA, the transport embarked troops at San Francisco and sailed for the western Pacific on 3 January 1945. After pausing briefly at Pearl Harbor she reached Ulithi, in the Western Carolines, on 23 January and served there as station ship until 19 March when she headed homeward. Admiral R. E. Coontz made one additional voyage from San Francisco to Ulithi. On her return she touched at San Francisco and San Diego, transited the Panama Canal, and pushed on across the Atlantic to France. She embarked troops for transfer to the Pacific theater cleared Marseilles on 21 July and reached Pearl Harbor on 12 August. Underway soon again, she paused at Eniwetok, Saipan, and Guam en route to Ulithi which she reached on 28 August, almost a fortnight after Japan capitulated.

    Leaving the Western Carolines on 12 September, Admiral R. E. Coontz sailed for Okinawa, whence she sailed on 27 September for the west coast of the United States. Making port at Bremerton, Washington, the transport embarked occupation troops before getting underway for Japan on 24 October. After disembarking troops at Nagasaki on 6 November and at Nagoya two days later, Admiral R. E. Coontz then made two round-trip voyages between Yokohama and Seattle. She then proceeded to Okinawa to embark passengers for the return voyage to the United States. Sailing for Hawaii, the transport embarked more troops at Pearl Harbor and reached New York City on 11 March 1946.

    As General Alexander M. Patch [ edit ]

    The Coontz entered the Todd Shipyard, Brooklyn, NY, on 17 March 1946 and was decommissioned there on the 25th. Stricken from the Navy list in April 1946 and turned over to the War Department, the ship underwent a period of repairs and alterations and was renamed General Alexander M. Patch, honoring General Alexander McCarrell Patch, commander of the victorious U.S. Army XIV Corps at Guadalcanal, and of the 7th Army in the invasion of Southern France in 1944 and Germany in 1945.

    In the Army Transport Service, General Alexander M. Patch carried troops and cargo between Europe and the United States from 1946 to 1950. Reacquired by the Navy on 3 March 1950, the ship operated for the next two decades as USNS General Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122) with the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS), later renamed the Military Sealift Command(MSC). From 1950 to 1965 the ship conducted 123 round-trip voyages between Bremerhaven and New York, with an additional 16 voyages to the Mediterranean. Among her passengers was Mrs. Alexander M. Patch, the widow of the general for whom the ship had been named.

    Among her operations was the embarkation of over 1,500 refugees in the Suez Crisis in November 1956. The transport took them from Souda Bay, Crete—where they had been brought from Alexandria, Egypt, and Haifa, Israel, by American warships — to Naples. Late in 1961, in the international tensions spawned by the Soviet Union's closure of access to West Berlin, General Alexander M. Patch participated in the massive lift of American troops to Europe.

    In August 1965, growing American involvement in the Vietnam War prompted the transfer of MSTS ships from the Atlantic to the Pacific. General Alexander M. Patch commenced her first Vietnam voyage at New York on 15 August. Steaming via Charleston, SC, and Long Beach, CA, the transport reached Qui Nhon, South Vietnam, on 16 September. Returning via Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, and Okinawa—to San Francisco on 2 October, the ship conducted one more voyage to Vietnam in 1965, reaching Vung Tau on 9 November. Clearing Vung Tau later that day, she returned to New York by way of Penang, Malaysia Rota, Spain and Bremerhaven.

    For the first six months of 1966, General Alexander M. Patch operated between New York and Bremerhaven. The Vietnam War once again compelled MSTS to switch some of its transports to the Pacific. General Alexander M. Patch and her sistership, USNS General William O. Darby  (T-AP-127) , embarked of the Army's 196th Light Infantry Brigade at Boston and departed on 15 July. Transiting the Panama Canal, the two transports reached Vung Tau, South Vietnam, on 13 August, ending the longest (12,358 nautical miles) point-to-point troop lift in the 17 years that MSTS had been in operation. Before the year was out, General Alexander M. Patch conducted two troop lifts of Republic of Korea troops from Pusan to South Vietnam.

    Placed in reserve in New York's upper bay along with three of her sisterships by the summer of 1967, General Alexander M. Patch was transferred to the custody of the Maritime Administration on 26 May 1970 and placed in reserve in the United States National Defense Reserve Fleet in the James River, Virginia.

    Fate [ edit ]

    The General Alexander M. Patch was sold for scrapping, 4 June 2001, to Esco Marine Inc., Brownsville, Texas.


    Admiral R. E. Coontz

    Robert Edward Coontz—born in Hannibal, Mo., on 11 June 1864—graduated in the Naval Academy Class of 1885, and served in the screw sloops-of-war Mohican and Juniata, the screw steamer Galena, and the protected cruiser Atlanta before he received his ensign's commission in 1887. He assisted in the development of the first modern signal code used by the Navy, and served in Alaskan waters and on the Great Lakes.


    Duty in the Bureau of Navigation, correcting and updating officer records, followed. During this time, he worked toward the formulation of legislation favorably affecting junior officers. Coontz later served with the Coast and Geodetic Survey and, in the cruiser Charleston, took part in the seizure of Guam and the bombardment of Manila during the Spanish–American War.


    After returning home he began almost a decade of sea duty, interrupted only by a brief tour with the Bureau of Equipment. As executive officer of Nebraska (Battleship No. 14), he took part in the cruise of the "Great White Fleet" from 1907 to 1909.


    Duty at the Naval Academy led to the office of Commandant of Midshipmen. Following service in the Bureau of Inspection and Survey he became Governor of Guam in April 1912. After exercising "efficient and enlightened" leadership in that island possession, Coontz assumed command of Georgia (Battleship No. 15), and saw expeditionary service in Mexican and Haitian waters during 1914.


    As commandant of the Puget Sound Navy Yard and the 13th Naval District from 1915 to 1918, Coontz won the Distinguished Service Medal. Becoming acting Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) in December 1918 while Admiral William S. Benson was on special duty in London, Coontz assisted the General Board in preparing a plan for a possible international navy under the League of Nations to maintain world peace.


    Given command of a battleship division in January 1919, Coontz supported the July 1919 flight of the NC flying boats across the Atlantic. After serving as Commander, Battleship Division 6, Pacific Fleet in September and October, Coontz became Chief of Naval Operations on 1 November 1919.


    During his tour as CNO from 1919 to 1925, Coontz achieved much despite the rapid demobilization of the Navy in the postwar years. He improved the organization and management of the Navy Department, and he strengthened the position of CNO in relation to the bureau chiefs. He realized the importance of aviation and submarines to the fleet, and advocated establishment of the Naval Research Laboratory in 1921. Under his direction a combined United States Fleet was formed. In the words of one biographer, Coontz "effectively encouraged experimentation and supported change, despite the constraints of the budget, politics, and the national mood."


    Following his term as CNO, Coontz became Commander in Chief of the United States Fleet. Maneuvers in Hawaiian waters in 1925 were the largest ever conducted by the assembled fleet. In the fall of 1925, Coontz became Commandant of the 5th Naval District and commanding officer of the Naval Operating Base, Norfolk. Following his retirement in 1928, Coontz was recalled briefly to active duty in 1930 to investigate Alaskan railroads. He became national commander in chief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in 1932 and, that same year, represented Alaska at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Coontz died on 26 January 1935 in the naval hospital at Bremerton, Wash.


    Robert Coontz, son of Benton Coontz, was born in Hannibal, Missouri. His parents were originally from Florida, Missouri, where they had been neighbors and schoolmates of a young Sam Clemens. Robert's father was involved in several businesses, including owning Hannibal's streetcar system. While a young boy, Robert Coontz left his name for posterity by carving it into the rock of Mark Twain Cave, then known as McDowell's Cave. [1] After completing his primary education in Hannibal public schools, Coontz attended Inglesile College from 1878 to 1879, and Hannibal College (now Hannibal-LaGrange University) from 1879 to 1880. [2] Coontz asked family friend Congressman William H. Hatch for an appointment to the United States Naval Academy. However, several other young men from the congressional district also desired the appointment so a competitive exam was arranged, which Coontz won.

    Coontz graduated from the Naval Academy in 1885, and served at the Navy Department and in several ships over the next decade, among them vessels stationed in Alaskan waters and the Great Lakes. He returned to the Navy Department late in 1894, to work on updating officer records, then was assigned to the cruiser USS Philadelphia, the Coast Survey and the cruiser USS Charleston. During the Spanish–American War Charleston and Coontz seized control of Guam, then joined Admiral George Dewey's forces in the Philippines. Coontz would remain in the Pacific, seeing action in the Philippine–American War. [3] Following further duty afloat and ashore, Coontz, then a lieutenant commander, was Executive Officer of the battleship USS Nebraska during the 1907–1909 world cruise of the "Great White Fleet".

    In 1899, Coontz became a Veteran Companion of the Pennsylvania Society of the Military Order of Foreign Wars.

    After promotion to commander in 1909, Coontz was Commandant of Midshipmen at the Naval Academy. In 1912–13, he was Governor of Guam. Captain Coontz then served as Commanding Officer of the battleship USS Georgia, followed by duty as Commandant of the Puget Sound Navy Yard and the 13th Naval District. He held those positions until late in 1918. Following a brief period as acting Chief of Naval Operations, Rear Admiral Coontz assumed command of a battleship division in the Atlantic.

    Coontz had just been assigned to the Pacific Fleet in September 1919, when he was selected to become Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), succeeding Admiral William S. Benson. Reportedly, his term as CNO was marked by unceasing pressure for economy, Congressional unhappiness over base closings, diplomatic efforts to achieve naval limitations, internal Navy Department conflicts over organization and the best ways to manage new technologies, plus the naval fallout of the Teapot Dome scandal. While dealing with these problems, Admiral Coontz established a unified United States Fleet and strengthened the CNO's position within the Navy Department.

    Relieved as CNO in August 1923, by Admiral Edward W. Eberle, Coontz was able to return to sea as Commander in Chief of the United States Fleet. In 1925, he led the fleet on a trans-Pacific visit to New Zealand and Australia, the first massed deployment of American battleships since the "Great White Fleet" cruise, nearly two decades earlier, and a valuable demonstration of their strategic reach. Admiral Coontz is also acknowledged for his key role in the promotion of US naval aviation. He lobbied for converting the USS Lexington and USS Saratoga from Lexington-class battlecruisers to Lexington-class aircraft carriers following the Washington Naval Treaty, ships that would prove vital for training in the inter-war years and as fighting ships during World War II. [4] From October 1925, until his retirement in June 1928, Coontz served as Commandant of the Fifth Naval District, reverting to the rank of rear admiral.

    After retiring, Coontz wrote a memoir chronicling his early life growing up in Hannibal, Missouri, and his navy career, titled From the Mississippi to the Sea. [2] A second book, True Anecdotes of an Admiral, was published in 1934. [5] Coontz was briefly recalled to active duty in 1930, to investigate railroads in Alaska. Two years later in 1932, Coontz would represent Alaska at the Democratic National Convention. It was also in 1932, that he became Commander-in-Chief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. [6] After suffering a series of heart attacks beginning in 1934, Admiral Robert E. Coontz died on 26 January 1935, at the Puget Sound Naval Hospital in Bremerton, Washington. Coontz is buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery in his native Hannibal, Missouri.


    Admiral Re Coontz AP-122 - History

    The U.S. naval presence in China dates from the earliest days of the republic: the 'Empress of China' arrived in Canton in 1784, the first ship flying the new U.S. flag to enter the China trade. Extensive interests in China have continued to form the heart of U.S. Pacific policy to this day.

    The United States was not a participant in the mid-19th century wars against China, but it was quick to take advantage of China's undoing. Indeed, during the Second Opium War, in 1858, U.S. Commodore Josiah Tattnall justified open support of his British counterpart with the statement that "blood is thicker than water," ignoring the fact that the United States was not at war with China. And U.S. warships continued to follow their Royal Navy cousins on China's waterways.

    The USS Susquehanna was the first U.S. warship to steam up the mighty Yangtze River, in 1853 a motley collection of ships followed over the years, typically those fit for no other duty. One was the USS Palos, the first gunboat to bear this name. Her arrival on the Yangtze in 1871 drew the scornful opinion of her fleet commander Rear Admiral T. A. Jenkins, that:

    "she burns a great quantity of coal, is slow, and draws too much water to go to many places that a gunboat of her tonnage should be able to reach neither her appearance nor her battery is calculated to produce respect for her."

    Until six river gunboats were designed and built in Shanghai in 1926, U.S. naval and diplomatic officers, businessmen, and missionaries in China made such remarks frequently.

    Early in the 20th century, U.S. interests in China continued to increase, as businessmen and missionaries expanded their solicitation efforts. This accelerated activity in a China torn by revolt and unrest led to demands for increased naval presence, which was formalized in the creation of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet (and the Yangtze River Patrol) in December 1922. Service on the Yangtze, a river of 1,500 navigable miles marked by frequently shifting channels, sharp bends, and currents of more than 14 knots, demanded ships with maneuverability, speed, and sturdiness. An upper Yangtze River inspector sounded the common theme in 1924 "Vessels should be of adequate dimensions, speed, and have powerful haulage equipment" to combat the river's natural and manmade hazards.

    The first "modern" U.S. warships arrived on the Yangtze only in 1903, when the USS Villalobos and USS Elcano arrived from the Philippines, where they had been captured from the Spanish in 1898. The ships were hot, dirty, and poorly ventilated. They also were underpowered, underarmed, and generally unsuitable for river duty but they patrolled the Yangtze for a quarter-century nonetheless.

    By the turn of the century the China station was perhaps the most sought-after assignment in the USS Navy. Americans were above the law there, and most hedonistic pleasures were readily and cheaply available.

    The Navy's General Board addressed river gunboat characteristics in almost every annual shipbuilding program from 1904 onward and frequently received design recommendations from naval officers in China. In 1910, board president Admiral George Dewey recommended a 3-foot draft, 14-knot speed, twin-screws, "several rudders for extreme handiness," combined coal- and oil-fueled boilers, bulletproof protection, and a battery of two 6-pounders, two 3-inch mounts, and six machine guns. He also suggested building these ships as double-enders - fitted with screws and rudders at both ends - since they had to operate in narrow channels.

    The Navy succeeded in funding two new river gunboats in June 1912. The USS Monocacy and USS Palos were built to plans from Yarrow Company, a Scottish firm that had built gunboats for the Royal Navy. They were constructed at the Mare Island (California) Navy Yard, then broken down for shipment to China, where they were reassembled.

    While describing the need for new river gunboats for China was easy enough, detailing their characteristics and gathering design information to get them funded was quite another matter. The Monocacy and Palos remained distinctive. The General Board noted in November 1917 that "gunboat no. 22" had been authorized by Congress but not appropriated for and requested that river gunboats be requested again in 1918. These craft were included in the General Board's shipbuilding programs for 1920 through 1924, but to no avail.

    The Asiatic Fleet commander at the time, Admiral W. L. Rodgers, was of course a strong advocate of new gunboats. He also extolled the virtues of Shanghai's Kiangnan shipyard as a likely contractor for new gunboats, noting that the yard had British managers and previously had built freighters for the U.S. Army.

    In a 21 February 1923 message, Rodgers said that a gunboat "speed 16 knots length 200 feet draft 5 feet can be built including all machinery except ordnance at Shanghai. Delivery 12 months cost $400,000." The admiral recommended "four replacements this year." The Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Robert E. Coontz, also received a picture of a "TwinScrew Passenger & Cargo Steamer Specially Desined and Built for the Upper Yangtze Service Between Ichang & Chungking" by Kiangnan Dock and Engineering works of Shanghai, a supporting


    Admiral Re Coontz AP-122 - History

    After promotion to Commander in 1909, Robert E. Coontz was Commandant of Midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy. In 1912-14, he was Governor of Guam. Captain Coontz then served as Commanding Officer of the battleship Georgia, followed by duty as Commandant of the Puget Sound Navy Yard and the 13th Naval District. He held those positions until late in 1918, enhancing a reputation as an effective administrator. Following a brief period as acting Chief of Naval Operations, Rear Admiral Coontz assumed command of a battleship division in the Atlantic.

    Coontz had just been assigned to the Pacific Fleet in September 1919 when he was selected to become Chief of Naval Operations, succeeding Admiral William S. Benson. His term as CNO was marked by unceasing pressure for economy, Congressional unhappiness over base closings, diplomatic efforts to achieve naval limitations, internal Navy Department conflicts over organization and the best ways to manage new technologies, plus the naval fallout of the Teapot Dome scandal. While dealing successfully with these problems, Admiral Coontz was also able to establish a unified United States Fleet and strengthen the CNO's position within the Navy Department.


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